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Posted by on Sep 13, 2013 in African | 0 comments

Zulu Dance: Exciting Tourist Attraction in South Africa

Zulu Dance: Exciting Tourist Attraction in South Africa

The Zulu dance with Zulu culture alllow for an exciting tourist attraction in South Africa.

The Zulu individuals have many dances which they used to dance. Their dances will vary and they are danced in different occasions.The Zulu traditions and culture are just as much a way of life as they are a tourist attraction. The Zulu, meaning people of heaven, really are a proud nation that treasure their heritage, are friendly and try to hospitable; displaying an unyielding loyalty for their inkosi (traditional leader).

Reed Dance Festival

A large number of Zulu virgins converge at the Enyokeni Zulu Royal Palace in September each year to celebrate the Umkhosi woMhlanga (Reed Dance Festival). The Reed dance is definitely an activity that promotes purity among virgin girls and respect for ladies. The festival is part of the annual festivities around the calendar of the Zulu nation. Throughout the Reed dance the virgins fetch the reeds in the river and bring them to the palace for that royal king, King Goodwill Zwelithini to examine. It was during this festival the Zulu King chose his youngest wife. Many people criticize this festival, claiming it disempowers young women who may be made wives while very young without being given a choice decide the husband that they like. But to a lot of, this ceremony helps to preserve the custom of keeping girls as virgins until they get wed.

Types of Zulu Dance

Bull Dance
Bull Dance a dance that originated from the cramped confines from the mine dormitories imitating a bull using the arms held aloft and the legs brought down having a thump. The rural girls their very own version.

Hunting Dance

The Hunting Dance imitates those things of hunting and the bravery it takes. This fiery dance is danced using sticks rather than spears to avoid injury and was danced prior to the hunt began. The girls also dance their very own version but to welcome the boys back from the hunt.

Dance of the Small Shield

The Dance from the Small Shield dates from Shaka’s some time and is a rhythmic dance accustomed to encourage military unity. Today it’s normally performed at Royal occasions. An identical dance using a spear and shield may be the umGhubho.

Zulu Dance of the Small Shield

Zulu Dance of the Small Shield

UmQhogoyo

The umQhogoyo involves violent shaking from the upper body.

The umBhekuzo Dance

The umBhekuzo represents the adapt of the tides with the men alternately advancing and retreating around the audience. Those at the ends raise their aprons exposing their buttocks.

UmChwayo

The dancers’ bodies relocate snakelike unison accompanied by singing within the UmChwayo.

umGhebulo

The umGhebulo appears as if the dancers wish to pull down the sky or climb an imaginary ladder into it.

IliKhomba

The iliKhomba is a graceful dance with rhythmic movements from the upper body accompanied by the swinging of the long decorated stick.

Dancing and singing is extremely a part of the lifestyle of the Zulu people, and every dance formation or movement symbolizes a celebration or happening within the clan. You have the rhythmical dance of the smal shield, the fiery motivation body movements from the hunting dance, the symbolizing from the tidal ebb and flow in the Umbhekuzo, the snakelike motion from the umchwayo and the challenging war dance /umghubha) with traditional shield and spear.

Also captivating for visitors may be the opportunity to witness the disciplined and dignified social structure of the Zulu homestead (umuzi). Customs pertaining to food and also the brewing of beer, ancestoral worship and places of burial, the gown code for men, women and children, the trole from the traditional healer (inyanga), the importance of your cattle, the system of compensating a parent for the loss of his daughter in marriage (lobola), courtship, witchcraft and superstitions continue to be observed.

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